REDUCING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF SURGERY ON A GLOBAL SCALE: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND CO-PRIORITIZATION WITH HEALTHCARE WORKERS IN 132 COUNTRIES: systematic review and co-prioritization with healthcare workers in 132 countries

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

19 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Background: Healthcare cannot achieve net-zero carbon without addressing operating theatres. The aim of this study was to prioritize feasible interventions to reduce the environmental impact of operating theatres.

Methods: This study adopted a four-phase Delphi consensus co-prioritization methodology. In phase 1, a systematic review of published interventions and global consultation of perioperative healthcare professionals were used to longlist interventions. In phase 2, iterative thematic analysis consolidated comparable interventions into a shortlist. In phase 3, the shortlist was coprioritized based on patient and clinician views on acceptability, feasibility, and safety. In phase 4, ranked lists of interventions were presented by their relevance to high-income countries and low–middle-income countries.

Results: In phase 1, 43 interventions were identified, which had low uptake in practice according to 3042 professionals globally. In phase 2, a shortlist of 15 intervention domains was generated. In phase 3, interventions were deemed acceptable for more than 90 per cent of patients except for reducing general anaesthesia (84 per cent) and re-sterilization of ‘single-use’ consumables (86 per cent). In phase 4, the top three shortlisted interventions for high-income countries were: introducing recycling; reducing use of anaesthetic gases; and appropriate clinical waste processing. In phase 4, the top three shortlisted interventions for low–middle-income countries were: introducing reusable surgical devices; reducing use of consumables; and reducing the use of general anaesthesia.

Conclusion: This is a step toward environmentally sustainable operating environments with actionable interventions applicable to both high– and low–middle–income countries.
Idioma originalInglés
Páginas (desde-hasta)804-817
Número de páginas14
PublicaciónBritish Journal of Surgery
Volumen110
N.º7
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 1 jul. 2023

Nota bibliográfica

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of BJS Society Ltd.

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