COVID‑19 SYMPTOMS AT HOSPITAL ADMISSION VARY WITH AGE AND SEX: RESULTS FROM THE ISARIC PROSPECTIVE MULTINATIONAL OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

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Resumen

Despite the pandemic’s immense human cost, enormous economic toll, and extensive research response, the precise clinical characteristics of COVID-19 remain unclear [1]. At the start of the outbreak, COVID-19 was broadly characterised as a severe respiratory illness presenting with fever, cough and an atypical pneumonia [2,3,4,5]. Altered sense of taste and smell have since been found to be strongly associated with the disease [6, 7]. However, a review of 77 observational studies found substantial proportions of patients presenting with less typical symptoms [8]. Different sets of clinical criteria for suspected COVID-19 have been produced by the World Health Organization (WHO) [9], Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States [10], Public Health England [11], and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control [12] (Table 1). Defining presenting symptoms of COVID-19 is further complicated by clinical experience suggesting that patients frequently present with atypical symptoms other than cough, fever and shortness of breath. This variation in the clinical characterisation of COVID-19 is problematic, as case definitions are used to guide clinical diagnosis, disease surveillance, and public health interventions.
Idioma originalEspañol (Ecuador)
PublicaciónInfection
EstadoPublicada - 25 jun. 2021
Publicado de forma externa

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